Berry Crumble Cake

This was inspired by Canadian Baker but as we’re not quite into stone fruit season, I used a frozen berries – mainly blackberries and some raspberries thrown in for good measure. I also substituted the sour cream for low fat natural yoghurt as it was all I had and wholemeal plain flour for the plain flour as I’m trying to use more whole foods across all areas of my cooking at the moment. It all seemed to work and I must say it was delicious and I can’t wait to make it with some in season stone fruits this summer.

Berry Crumble Cake

  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • finely grated rind of 1 lemon
  • 1 tbs lemon juice
  • 2 cups plain flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • pinch nutmeg
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 6 cups pitted sliced plums (about 1.25kg) or frozen berries or fruit of choice
  • 1 1/4 cup plain flour
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/2 cup butter, melted
  1. Grease a 13x9inch slice tin and preheat oven to 180C
  2. Cream butter and sugar and rind
  3. Add eggs, beating well after each addition
  4. Add the flour, baking powder and soda, alternating with some of the sour cream
  5. Spoon into the tin
  6. Top with the fruit
  7. Combine the flour, brown sugar and nutmeg
  8. Add the melted butter
  9. Strew over the top of the fruit
  10. Bake for 45-55 minutes

Delicious on its own or served warm with ice cream.

Passionfruit pineapple tarts, choc-caramel tarts, neenish tarts

A trio of icings

I have been pining for old fashioned pineapple tarts that traditional bakeries make. The ones with a short pastry, pineapple filling, moch cream and topped with passionfruit icing. Linda helped by providing the pineapple filling recipe from the Presbyterian Ladies’ Cookbook or some such treasure trove of old fashioned pre-world war II (apparently) delights.

Pineapple Passionfruit tartlets
Pineapple filling

  • 1 medium pineapple, sliced very finely then diced (easier to do this if the pineapple is cold)
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 tbs cornflour
  • 2 tbs water
  • 1 egg yolk
  1. Combine the pineapple, sugar and water in a saucepan and bring to a gentle boil to cook for 10 minutes
  2. Combine the cornflour, water and egg yolk then stir into the pineapple and cook until thickened

I can’t tell you how making this, then tasting it made me feel. I was jettisoned back to my childhood and the fact that I now had the recipe to make whenever I feel like it was so empowering and exciting! Next

Moch cream

  • 125g butter, softened
  • 80g icing sugar
  • 1/3 cup milk, warmed
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla
  • 2 tbs boiling water
  1. Beat the butter and sugar until pale and fluffy
  2. Add the combined milk, vanilla and water a little at a time until all incorporated
  3. Just try not to eat this straight from the bowl.

Passionfruit Icing

  • 1 1/2 cups icing sugar
  • 30g butter, softened
  • 1 passionfruit
  • 1 1/2 tbs boiling water
  1. Beat the icing sugar with the butter and water by hand
  2. Add the passionfruit by spooning the pulp into a small strainer then push the juice of one half of the passionfruit through, adding some of the seeds to dot the icing.
  3. You might need to add more passionfruit depending on the texture. You want it somewhere between being spreadable and being a glaze. (in the picture above, my first attempt, the icing was a bit too stiff)

Shortcrust pastry

  • 4 cups plain flour
  • 350g unsalted butter
  • 1/4 – 1/2 cup cold water
  1. Rub the butter through the flour
  2. Add enough water to bring the dough together
  3. Flatten to a disc and refrigerate for 30 minutes
  4. Roll out to quite thin and line 12 1/4 cup tartlet cases. Prick bases and bake in 180C oven until golden.

This pastry recipe is the one I use for everything. I very rarely make a sweet shortcrust pastry as I find using straight shortcrust helps counterbalance the sweetness of a pie filling. The following pastry however, is perfect for a neenish tart, where the pastry is really a major part of the experience. It is much more like a biscuit crust.

To build the tartlets

  1. Spoon some pineapple into the base
  2. Top with moch cream and smooth surface
  3. Spoon over icing with a palette knife and smooth off.

Neenish Tarts
Pastry for Neenish Tarts

  • 125g soft butter
  • 1/3 cup caster sugar
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 egg
  • 1 1/2 cups self-raising flour
  1. Using an electric mixer with paddle attachment, beat together the butter and sugar for 4 minutes until pale and fluffy
  2. Add vanilla and egg and beat until combined
  3. Stir through the flour then wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 20 minutes
  4. Roll out to 3mm thick and line 12 1/4 cup capacity tartlet tins
  5. Prick bases and bake at 180C for 10 minutes.

Icing

  • 1 1/2 cups icing sugar
  • 30g butter, softened
  • 1 tbs water (you can use sherry for a grown-up version)
  • 1 1/2 tbs cocoa powder
  • 1 tsp lemon juice
  1. Beat the icing sugar, butter and 1 1/2 tbs of boiling water by hand
  2. Divide the mixture in half. Either add 1 tsp of sherry or the 1 tsp of lemon juice to one half and set aside
  3. Add remaining sherry to cocoa and stir to combine then mix in to remaining icing

To build the tarts

  1. Fill the pastry case with a spoon of jam
  2. Top with moch cream and level out
  3. Using a small palette knife ice half of each tart with the chocolate icing then ice the other halves with the lemon/white icing, smoothing to edges.

It’s best we not speak of just how many I ate.

ro

even it’s name is enticing no?
I have always wondered what a jam roly poly was and in my impressive laziness resulting in a lack of research had simply presumed it was a rectangular sponge covered with jam and then rolled up.
How wrong I was.
Just as this curiosity was sitting there, along with my curiosity about a whole lotta things, out comes the latest Gourmet Traveller and the weekly edition of Good Living, both featuring a jam roly poly.
Get this.
It’s more of a scone wrapped around jam than a sponge.
I know. Move over Wikepedia.

Anyway,
that is the pic of the Jam Roly Poly in the latest GT – I mean, if that doesn’t make y0u want to make it, what will I say.
And yes, I even made the jam. I’m not a huge marmalade fan, but this – which I slightly modified – was very moreish indeed.
Also – mine looked nothing like this – my jam was not as dark and syrupy (similar to my insecurities about my kneading ability, I have similar angst about making jam. that said, this one set without me using Jamsetta and is delicious, it just wasn’t thick and syrupy enough to hold that much shape in the roll).

The jam

  • 4 oranges (I used 3 oranges, 1 tangelo)
  • 2 lemons
  • 6 mandarins
  • 220g white sugar
  • 1/4 cup lemon or orange liqueur (I used Cointreau)
  1. – Peel and segment the oranges, lemons and two of the mandarins. Do this over a bowl to catch juices.
  2. – Remove pips and set aside.
  3. – Using your hands, push down on the segments to release juices into a measuring cup.
  4. – Squeeze the remaining four mandarins and add to to the juice from the segments – you need 1 cup of juice.
  5. – Tie the seeds up in a muslin cloth
  6. – Combine the juices and sugar in a heavy based saucepan, bring to a simmer to dissolve sugar
  7. – Add the fruit, pips and liqueur and simmer for 20-25 minutes or until syrupy. Cool completely before use

The cake*

  • 2 1/3 cups SR flour
  • 2 tbsp caster sugar
  • 120g butter, chopped
  • Finely grated rind of 2 oranges and 1 lemon (Use the rind off some of the fruit used in the jam. Grate the rinds before peeling and segmenting fruit.)
  • 175ml buttermilk
  1. – Preheat oven to 180C
  2. – Combine the flour, sugar and rinds
  3. – Rub through the butter until it resembles breadcrumbs
  4. – Cut through the buttermilk (treat it like a scone batter, so work lightly and quickly)
  5. – Turn onto a lightly floured piece of grease-proof paper and form into a 25cm log
  6. – Roll out to a rectangle that’s 27cmx30cm
  7. – Spread over 2/3 of the jam, leaving a 3cm border
  8. – Roll lengthways, pressing the edges together as you go
  9. – Brush surface with some buttermilk
  10. – Now, the recipe says to wrap the roll in the grease-proof paper and tie the ends. I’m not sure why you do this, maybe to keep it in a tight roll as otherwise it might just spread outways… or something?
  11. – Place on a baking tray and cook for 35 minutes.

Serve warm with cream or ice-cream (or both) and some of the leftover jam if desired.

The recipe in Good Living used a jar of apricot jam, which may be what I do next time. I’ll keep the rinds in the batter though as it gave lovely flavour.

*This is basically like a scone dough. In fact, with the rinds adding an extra depth of flavour I may use this recipe for my next batch of scones.