sour cream streusel cup cakes

Last week I met up with Mrs Woog and Beach Cottage and other lovely ladies at the park so the kids could go and play soccer with a creepy dad and other strangers. I took some of these tasty little numbers with me and Mrs Woog has been asking for the recipe (or me to drop more into her which school holidays has made near impossible).

The recipe comes from my mother-in-law and I’m not sure where it comes from before her. You can make it as a cake, in which case you put half the batter in the tin, cover with the streusel, add the rest of the batter and then top with the rest of the streusel. But there’s something about them as cupcakes – little mouthfuls of contentment.

This recipe can be halved to make one 24cm cake. I’m not sure how many cupcakes it’d make as I always do double. This makes I’ve made the cupcakes two ways – one where I’ve put some batter in the patty pan then streusel then batter then streusel but it’s fiddly and annoying. My advice is to top with a heaped dessert spoon of the streusel and then – oh so delicately (not) – smoosh it in to the batter. (The picture below however is when I did the former rather than the latter) I haven’t doubled the streusel topping as when I did it made LOADS too much – it’d be find if you were making a cake but as cupcakes you don’t need as much.

Sour Cream Streusel Cake

Cake

  • 250g butter
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cups plain flour
  • 1tsp baking powder
  • 1tsp bi-carb
  • 1tsp vanilla
  • 1 cup sour cream

Streusel

  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup nuts (I’ve used mixed nuts, pecans and pistachios. I’ve chopped them up in a processor or chopped them roughly. Basically do whatever floats your boat.)
  • 1tsp cinnamon
  1. Preheat oven to 180C and line patty pans with liners (it will make 15-18)
  2. Put all the ingredients for the cake in a food processor and blend until smooth and pale.
  3. Combine the streusel ingredients
  4. Place a heaped dessert spoon in your patty pan liners, top with a heaped spoon of streusel and smoosh into the batter a bit.
  5. Bake for 15-20 minutes

 

Outrageously easy slice

You can all blame Inner Pickle for this one. Or perhaps the people of Mayflower village from where the cookbook containing the recipe came from. It’s called Easy Slice and while it is that, the name totally underplays what this slice is. It’s like a snickers with coconut. It’s addictive. It is outrageously easy to make. And dangerously easy to eat.

 

Part of me wants to call it Slut Slice because it’s so easy and goes down a treat. What? Too much?

 

My pictures do not do it justice. In fact, when I took them I thought, ‘man, few could make a slice containing all forms of sugar, chocolate and saturated fat could make it look like a lasagne but I have’. Then Mum saw it and asked if it was a lasagne type dish and then BabyMac said the same thing about the meat and cheesy looking picture in my last post.

So maybe I should call it Not Lasagne Slice .


Easy Slice  

Mayflower Village Cookery Book via Inner Pickle

  • 6oz (185g) butter, melted
  • 1 packet Nice biscuits, crushed
  • 1 packet choc chips (mine was 230g as was Inner Pickles)
  • 1 packet walnuts (Inner Pickle’s was 120g, I used unsalted peanuts which I then toasted – I didn’t measure them, instead I just sprinkled them over the top for a good coverage)
  • 2oz (about 3/4 cup) shredded coconut
  • 1 tin (395g) condensed milk
  1. Preheat the oven to 180C and line a slice tin (18cm x 27cm) with baking paper
  2. Pour in the melted butter then spread over the crushed biscuit
  3. Sprinkle over the choc chips, then the nuts and then the coconut
  4. Pour the condensed milk over the top
  5. Bake for 20 minutes.
Let it cool completely before trying to remove from the tin or cutting it as otherwise the base will just crumble into a thousand pieces. I know I know, it’s hard to wait but believe me, it’s totally worth it.

 

 

Apple custard teacakes

A few weeks back the Australian Womens’ Weekly had a recipe for a Raspberry Custard Teacake in it. I made it. Three times. It was good but there was something lacking. Or actually more annoying for you see, the custard, it kept sinking. I knew it would, you could see it in the photos in the magazine but I didn’t want it to sink, I wanted it through the cake.

So I mulled on it a while.

And then, in making something else from the magazine’s cookbook 1000 Best Ever Recipes from AWW I came across a recipe for apple custard cupcakes. With some tweaking (the apple coming from its apple pie slice rather than plain sliced apple) I have found it. The best cupcake ever. EVER!

Use a traditional sized cupcake tray, not a muffin tray. I have also made it as a cake by doubling it all but it was a bit tricky and I burnt the crap out of the bottom of it as it – obviously – needs a while to cook through. Next time I’d probably make it as a slab cake rather than round tall cake.

Apple Custard Teacakes

1000 Best Ever Recipes from AWW

The cake

  • 90g butter
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup caster sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 3/4 cup SR flour
  • 1/4 cup custard powder
  • 2 tbsp milk
  • Topping:
  • 30g butter, melted
  • 1 tblsp caster sugar
  • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

The apple (you’ll only use about half of this in the recipe but mmm stewed apples, put the leftovers on your brekkie – unless you have eggs, because that’d be gross)

  • 6 medium apples (just under 1kg), peeled, cored, cut into 1cm pieces
  • 1/4 cup caster sugar
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 3/4 cup sultanas
  • 1 tsp mixed spice
  • 2 tsp finely grated lemon rind

The custard

  • 1 tbsp custard powder
  • 1 tbsp caster sugar
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1/4 tsp vanilla extract
To make the custard:
  1. Mix the custard powder and sugar with the milk and vanilla
  2. In a small saucepan stir over heat until the mixture boils and thickens
  3. Remove from heat, pour into a bowl, cover the surface with clingwrap and cool
To cook the apples:
  1. Cooke apples, sugar, the water and sultanas in a large saucepan, uncovered and stirring occasionally for about 10 minutes or until the apple is soft and the mixture is not too wet
  2. Stir in spice and rind and let cool.
To make the cake:
  1. Preheat oven to 180C and line 12 hole 1/3 cup cupcake (or small muffin) tray
  2. Beat the butter, sugar, extract, eggs, flour, custard powder and milk in a small bowl of an electric mixer until ingredients combined, then increase speed and beat until mixture has turned to a pale colour
  3. Spoon 1 heaped dessert spoon (approx) into each paper case (or divide whole mixture in half then distribute half into the paper cases)
  4. Top with a heaped teaspoon of apple mixture
  5. Top the apple with a heaped teaspoon of custard
  6. Top the custard with another heaped dessert spoon of cake batter – try and cover the custard, yes, a bit fiddly but worth it.
  7. Bake cakes for about 30 minutes
  8. Brush hot cakes with melted butter and sprinkle over combined sugar and cinnamon
Try to eat only one.

Chai chai chachacha

Firstly, did you see what I did up there, God I crack myself up.

So, Jasper and Grover’s pregnancies and subsequent bouts of insanity ended my love-affair with coffee. Or with a skim mocha more appropriately. Coffee now makes my tummy sad and my nerves very very edgy. I am officially a tea drinking through and through. I even make my own blend of loose leaf tea. Because tea aficionados can be just as pretentious as coffee ones.

I ‘discovered’ chai along with the rest of the western world and while I appreciate proper chai tea all that milk can make me feel pretty skeevy. When I saw Suse’s post (and far more lovely pictures than my own) about this chai mix I knew I had to give it a go.

This came from the lovely Suse but I have adjusted it, using skim condensed milk and doubling the spice mix – again I like it sweet but not too sweet and not too milky. I also ramped up the cinnamon content because my level of cinnamon adoration is probably bordering on creepy. Obviously if you like it sweet and milky just halve the spice quantities I outline below.

Seriously, this is the best. I keep it in a cute jar in the fridge and every morning have my fancy pants chai tea. It lasts me a week.

 

Chai mix

  • 1 can skim condensed milk
  • 1 tsp ground cardamon
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp ground allspice
  • 1/2 tsp ground cloves
  • few good grinds of black pepper
  1. Mix it all together, pop it in a jar and store in the fridge for up to one week
  2. To use, stir a dessert spoon into a cup of strong black tea.

Noice.

 

Pineapple Apple Slice

Don’t you love reviving a recipe you used to made decades ago only to discover it is as delicious as your memories made it? I’d be nervous to try that principle with my Nan’s chow mein (think a lot of cabbage, beef mince and curry paste, there may even have been sultanas) or Mum’s apricot chicken (the one using the can of apricot nectar and the packet of french onion dip mix which I still see doing the rounds) but with this slice it was a delightful trip down memory lane.

Seriously, it’s probably been more than two decades since I started making this. I am fairly certain it is a Women’s Weekly recipe – how could it not be! When Mum had a piece she recalled this was one of the first recipes I made from go to wo on my own. So I was probably 10 or 12.

Pineapple Apple Slice

  • 185g butter
  • Finely grated rind of 1 lemon
  • 3/4 cup caster sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup plain flour
  • 1/2 cup self-raising flour
  • 410g can of crushed pineapple, well drained
  • 480g can of pie apple
  1. Grease and flour a 22cm square cake pan and preheat the oven to 180C
  2. Cream the butter, sugar and lemon rind
  3. Add the eggs one at a time and beat well
  4. Fold in the flour, the batter with be thick
  5. Spoon half the mix into the base of the tin and spread evenly
  6. Top with the mixed tinned pineapple and apple
  7. Dollop spoons of the batter over the top and smooth out as best you can – this is not a precise science, it’s OK to have some of the filling sticking through
  8. Bake for 45 minutes, cool and then sift over some icing sugar.