Sago pudding with mango and lime

We are hurtling officially towards summer down here (ie tomorrow) and to be frank I am not pleased. I do not do hot weather and even moreso, humidity. I was truly born in the wrong country although Tasmania would probably do quite nicely. Beautiful countryside, lower temps, less humidity and a great food culture. Let’s sit with that for a moment shall we?

The only redeeming feature for me in these hotter months, apart from washing drying on the line in an hour rather than a day, is the food. Stone fruits, mangos, papaya, crisp Asian salads loaded with lime, mint, coriander and chilli and cooking outside.

Actually Sydney’s climate means I could/should use the BBQ year round but I always tend to forget it’s there once the heater is in action. The main reason I like cooking outside is I don’t have to clean down the cooktop. Yes, I am that lazy.

This dessert is fairly and squarely placed in my summer repertoire and all the boys love it. Along with the black sticky rice it sits in relatively high rotation, topped with mango or other summer fruits, drizzled with a palm sugar syrup, extra coconut cream and lime to give it zing.

Some people call it sago, some call it tapioca, we call it frogs eggs. There are myriad recipes for its use but this is my go-to.

Frog's eggs with coconut, palm sugar syrup, mango and lime. Giddyup #everyfuckingnight
Frog’s eggs with coconut, palm sugar syrup, mango and lime. Giddyup #everyfuckingnight

Tapioca pudding with mango and lime
The perfect summer dessert served with fresh tropical fruit
  • 2 cups sago
  • 200 ml coconut cream
  • 200 g palm sugar
  • 400 ml water
  • Mango, cut into slices or cubes
  • Lime wedges
  1. Bring a large saucepan of water to the boil and stir in the tapioca
  2. Cook for 15 minutes or until the beads are basically see-through, stirring regularly (this is important as they are pesky little things that like sticking to the bottom of the saucepan)
  3. Strain in a fine-holed sieve and rinse well under cold water (you'll still lose some but don't fret)
  4. Place in a bowl and stir through half the coconut cream and half the palm sugar syrup (see below)
  5. Chill for an hour or more
  6. To make the palm sugar syrup combine the palm sugar and water in a saucepan and bring to the boil
  7. Simmer until it is thick and syrupy
  8. To serve, spoon into a bowl, top with fruit, drizzle over some of the remaining coconut cream and sugar syrup and finish with a squeeze of fresh lime.
  9. For complete show-pony status you can initially pour them into moulds and then turn out when serving, fancy like.


Sticky pork spare ribs

Oh my lordy be, these sticky pork spare ribs are good. I reckon you could also do it to a whole piece of pork belly or to American style ribs, even beef ribs and get a sensational result.

There is a two step cooking process so you’re probably not making this on a school night but don’t let me stop you. We had it a couple of nights ago and there were leftovers (unheard of) (they were DELICIOUS cold too) but I’m already hankering for them again. I’ll going to experiment with different cuts of meat so I’ll keep you posted.

Asian pork spare ribs for #everyfuckingnight. What's on your plate?
Asian pork spare ribs for #everyfuckingnight. What’s on your plate?

Sticky pork spare ribs
A spicy sticky recipe for Chinese pork spare ribs
  • 12 Chinese pork spare ribs (these seem to be slightly different everywhere I get them, but they strips generally without a bone in them but sometimes a little bit of bone in them. Isn't that helpful. I now just get them at the Asian butcher because I figure it's gotta be right from there.)
  • 4 star anise
  • 4 slices ginger
  • 1 cup kecap manis (a thick sweet soy sauce, most supermarkets now stock it)
  • ¼ cup honey
  • 1 tbsp finely grated ginger
  • 1 tbsp dried chilli flakes (it sounds like a lot and the result is spicy but not mind-blowingly so, and that's on my palate which doesn't tolerate stupidly spicy food. Oscar also eats them and he is a no go zone for spicy food. Weird huh.)
  • 2 tsp Chinese five-spice powder
  1. Pop the pork, star anise and ginger into a saucepan and cover with cold water
  2. Bring it to the boil and then reduce to a simmer and cook for 45 minutes
  3. While the pork is cooking make the marinade by mixing it all together
  4. Preheat your oven to 180C
  5. Line 1-2 baking trays with baking paper
  6. Drain the ribs and lie them flat on the trays
  7. Using a pastry brush liberally cover the pork in the marinade on both sides
  8. Bake for 20 minutes, turning half way and basting with any left over marinade when the mood takes you (sometimes I completely forget the basting and guess what, still delicious!)
  9. Serve with steamed greens and rice
  10. Eat until your arteries clog.



Black sticky rice dessert

Two of my favourite desserts are tapioca (sago) served with a palm sugar syrup and coconut cream or this, black sticky rice served with mango, a squeeze of lime and coconut cream.

You will need to start it the day before to allow the rice to soak, but apart from that nuisance it comes together easily.

Black sticky rice w/mango and coconut cream. Special #everyfuckingnight today.
Black sticky rice w/mango and coconut cream. Special #everyfuckingnight today.

I double this because there is a chronic fear in this house we might run out of food. It makes a fair amount but it means there’s some left for the next day.

Black sticky rice
Earthy sweet black glutinous rice topped with coconut cream and mango
  • 200 g black glutinous rice
  • 1 ltr water
  • 150 g palm sugar, shaved
  • coconut cream
  • mango
  1. Soak the rice over night
  2. The next day drain the rice then combine with the water and bring to the boil
  3. Simmer for 30 minutes, covered over a low heat
  4. Stir in the palm sugar
  5. Simmer, covered, until nearly all the liquid is absorbed
  6. Serve with coconut cream and mango




In some very exciting news I have teamed up with Mrs Woog for a podcast we have ingeniously called Woog & Berry. Stay tuned, we should be going live in early December. Such a development!

The start of laab, a Thai pork mince salad, for #everyfuckingnight.
The start of laab, a Thai pork mince salad, for #everyfuckingnight.

In our first episode we talk about #everyfuckingnight and just how many things you can do with mince. Preferably we steer clear of 70s favourites of curried mince but embrace the rissole. I of course had to go all show pony and talk about this Thai mince, properly referred to as Laab.

It is an absolute snap to make and oddly enough all of my kids eat it. Granted I can not guarantee all of yours will but it is damn tasty and even if they have a bowl of cereal for dinner again you get something good down your gullet.

Pork mince tossed with fish sauce, lime juice, lots of herbs and chilli
  • 500g minced pork
  • 4 limes, juiced
  • 1 French shallot/red shallot/eschalot/whatever you call it in your state or country, finely sliced
  • 2 spring onions, finely sliced
  • half a bunch of coriander, chopped
  • 5 sprigs of mint, chopped
  • 3 tbsp fish sauce
  • 2 tbsp uncooked jasmine rice
  • chilli flakes to your personal preference
  1. Heat a wok and add the uncooked rice. Toast until browned and then coarsley grind
  2. Sprinkle a tablespoon of the lime juice over the raw mince and set aside while you get everything else ready
  3. In a bowl combine all the other ingredients including the toasted rice, have a taste and balance out the flavours if needed
  4. In the wok fry off the mince with no oil and toss until cooked through and quite dry
  5. Combine the fish sauce mix with the mince and again, taste to check there's a nice balance between the fish sauce, lime and herbs
  6. Serve with rice or salad. (I quite like the idea of a Thai sang chow bow with it served in iceberg lettuce leaves.)



Blueberry Crumble Slice

So I finally recently bought Smitten Kitchen‘s cookbook which is as good as I had hoped. I have followed her blog for as long as I can remember and have never ever had a recipe of hers fail. In the cookbook is a version of this using cranberries for the festive season.

This slice is divine, plain and simple. A basic shortbread base that is also scattered over the top of the blueberries. I’ve made this with apple and rhubarb (that I’d stewed previously) and blackberries and every time it turns out a treat.

This is @smittenkitchen's blueberry crumble slice.
This is @smittenkitchen’s blueberry crumble slice.

Blueberry Crumble Slice
Blueberries encased in a shortbread biscuity base and top
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 3 cups plain flour
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • 225 g butter
  • 1 egg
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 4 cups blueberries
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 4 tsp cornflour
  1. Preheat oven to 180C and line a 20x30cm pan
  2. Using a pastry cutter (or your fingers) blend the sugar, baking powder, plain flour, lemon zest with the butter
  3. Then add the egg
  4. Mix the juice, sugar and cornflour together in a bowl then toss through the blueberries
  5. Press half the dough into the baking tin
  6. Top with the blueberries
  7. Scatter over the remaining dough
  8. Bake for 45 - 60 minutes, until the top is nice and golden and the blueberries are bubbling.



Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...