Hugo

A post sponsored by Nuffnang

 

Do you remember the first movie you ever saw at the cinema? Mine was Star Wars, not bad eh. I was five, Dad was taking my brother and I BEGGED to go too. My main memories from it was how big the cinema was, how dark and cold it was as the lights went down and how LOUD it was. I imagine this was not George Lucas’s intent as far as memory goes but there you have it.

As time went on and I saw more movies – always a very special experience as a child – there was always that sense of wonder and awe at what I saw. Of being transported. A very early viewing was Dot and the Kangaroo  and then  Little Boy Lost. I cried in Little Boy Lost and I remember my aunt turning to me and chastising me for doing so. I choose to focus on the power of film to make a six-year-old cry rather than the surly aunt.

For fear of coming over all ‘back in my day’ there is something to be said about movies from my childhood versus movies from my children’s childhood. My recollection is that there was always an element of fantasy. That even if it was based in reality there was still an element of magic, of stretching the truth, of fantasy.

Which brings me to Hugo. OH man, I ADORED this movie. A.DORED. It is the story of a boy, Hugo, who lives in the walls of a train station in 1930s Paris. I KNOW. His life is precarious, fragile and solitary until a connection is made and a mystery unravelled. It is intoxicating. In the clip I’ve embedded below, Martin Scorsese – let’s call him Marty –  talks about film being magical but based in reality. That pretty much sums it up.

There’s a lot of film geek guff going on about it being in 3D and apparently James Cameron (you know, Titanic) said it was a masterpiece and the best use of 3D he’s ever seen. Who am I to argue and I’ve really been quite dismissive of the whole 3D experience (as @AnIdleDad once said, while you still have to wear glasses to see it 3D is dead to him) and I am totally talking through my arse to comment upon it, I do think the 3D component of it adds something to the depth of the film, the richness of the cinematography. It’s less about things jumping out at you and more about drawing you in to the world it portrays.

As it’s directed by Marty let’s be frank, it was destined by become an instant classic. The Golden Globes are on in a week and its nominated for Best Picture, Best Director and Best Original Score.

 

 

Hugo is played by Asa Butterfield, the actor who played Bruno in The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas. I can not express adequately how incredible he is.

Sacha Baron Cohen (Ali G, Bruno, Borat) plays the Station Inspector. I’m not sure if his appalling attempt at a French accent is meant to be ironic or for comedic effect but man, it’s b.a.d.

Below is Marty talking about the movie, Part 1 is more about the role of 3D and the decision process he underwent to use it (his 12-year-old daughter and her friends asked if it would be), this part is more about the story itself:

 

But enough about me, did Chef enjoy it? Did the BOYS enjoy it? Is ‘yes’ with a shoulder shrug an answer?

This really is about storytelling of old with the modern wonders of 3D. It unravels a mystery through telling the history of cinema. It’s a film about a boy but does that necessarily make it a film for children? Yes and no. All four of mine watched it WITHOUT the aid of popcorn, chips, drinks, chocolate or any other bribe. Grover (4) was the only one who got obviously restless. So yes, I would say that the cinematography is that visually intoxicating it will capture a child – be it an older (as in school age) or at least a thoughtful one.

I think it now stands as the movie to show children that all cinema is not action! and drama! and more action! That they can slow down and think in a movie. That there is more to be transfixed in a movie. Surely that is a wonderful thing.

 

I’ve got three double passes to give away. Leave a comment on one of the first movies you ever saw and how it affected you to be in the running.

It’s in cinemas from 12 January 2012.